High in fiber and rich in vitamins A and C, beets have more iron than other vegetables, including spinach.

Better yet, the classic beet’s red coloring comes from betalains — a combination of the purple and yellow pigments that deter the formation of cancer-causing free radicals. “The betalain pigments are potent antioxidants,” says Irwin Goldman, Ph.D., a beet geneticist at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Those pigments make beets a feast for the eyes as well as nourishment for your body. Beetroots’ rich reds, golden yellows, creamy whites, and stunning stripes will add a brilliant splash of seasonal color to your autumn meals.

Their bright green foliage with red veins and stems will brighten up your garden beds, too. Beet greens are also tasty raw, braised, or stir-fried. And if you allow a little of the foliage to continue growing, you get plump roots that you can store and eat after cold weather sets in.

Growing Beets

Beets are adapted to grow in cool temperatures, making them a perfect vegetable to plant both in spring and late summer. They thrive when the days are warm (60 to 70 degrees) and nights cool (50 to 60 degrees). They may go to seed if temperatures drop below 50 degrees for an extended period. Sow the seeds in full sun for the best roots; if you don’t have a sunny spot in your garden, plant them anyway — beets still produce a lot of leafy greens in partial shade.

Read more: https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/gardening/a20706898/growing-beets/